This is Monotropa hypopitys, also known as Dutchman’s pipe, yellow bird’s-nest or pinesap.
Image from swbiodiversity.org

This is Monotropa hypopitys, also known as Dutchman’s pipe, yellow bird’s-nest or pinesap.

Image from swbiodiversity.org

likeafieldmouse:

Monotropa uniflora

"Also known as the ghost plantIndian pipe, or corpse plant. 

Unlike most plants, it is white and does not contain chlorophyll. Instead of generating energy from sunlight, it is parasitic, more specifically a myco-heterotroph. Its hosts are certain fungi that are mycorrhizal with trees, meaning it ultimately gets its energy from photosynthetic trees. Since it is not dependent on sunlight to grow, it can grow in very dark environments as in the understory of dense forest. It is often associated with beech trees. 

The complex relationship that allows this plant to grow also makes propagation difficult.

The plant is sometimes completely white but commonly has black flecks and a pale pink coloration. Rare variants may have a deep red color.”

I used to visit this haunted house (I have so many stories, you wouldn’t believe) in my home state of WV… it was so spooky and my friends and I found dead things there all the time, from mice to deer to cats, it always smelled like death around it. I’d seen a lot of indian pipe (-especially- of the pink/red variety) in my childhood but I’ve never seen so much as what grew on that property.

There is much folklore surrounding them. My grandparents used to tell stories about how they only grew over dead animals and that the plant was actually its spirit leaving its body (My grandfather was Cherokee so it was likely a story he’d heard from his family). It is said to heal the broken heart of those mourning the loss of a loved one, and one Cherokee legend tells the story of Indian Pipes being created due to the selfishness of people. It was formerly categorized as a “saprophyte,” indicating a plant that obtains its nutrients from decaying matter. They are beneficial funguses and should be regarded as symbiotic rather than parasitic since they help trees & shrubs produce essential sugars. Native American healers mixed the plant’s juices with water to use as a lotion to treat eye problems, which gives the plant yet another name; “eye bright”.

I remember trying to put them in pots and keep them in my closet as a kid. I’d put little dead bugs in the dirt thinking they might feed off of them like a carnivorous plant only through the dirt. P:

PROUD

PROUD

sigh… wanderlust.

Samson and Delilah, great horned owls at the Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center. I can’t wait to go back, they were in the middle of remodeling last we went. One of many little hidden-away places in the keys we stumbled upon just driving around.

Samson and Delilah, great horned owls at the Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center. I can’t wait to go back, they were in the middle of remodeling last we went. One of many little hidden-away places in the keys we stumbled upon just driving around.

While I was feeling afraid, confused and discarded, my wonderful Judas send this to me via Skype and it made me feel so appreciated and valued. The time she must have put into this… Boogle’s perfectly doll-like face, Gromble’s look of “oh, I went too far this time… let me fix you up”… the atmosphere is perfect… ugh, just… the idea that she took the time out of her life to make me this just came at just the right time to turn my tears into happy ones. Love you wolfie <3(And this is only the cropped version! You’ll have to follow wingsofjudas to see the full thing once it’s scanned and posted!)

While I was feeling afraid, confused and discarded, my wonderful Judas send this to me via Skype and it made me feel so appreciated and valued. The time she must have put into this… Boogle’s perfectly doll-like face, Gromble’s look of “oh, I went too far this time… let me fix you up”… the atmosphere is perfect… ugh, just… the idea that she took the time out of her life to make me this just came at just the right time to turn my tears into happy ones. Love you wolfie <3
(And this is only the cropped version! You’ll have to follow wingsofjudas to see the full thing once it’s scanned and posted!)

magnoliaboddy:

Toy aisle, 1980s.

lookit the pony plushes and ponywear aahhhh *dives in*

magnoliaboddy:

Toy aisle, 1980s.

lookit the pony plushes and ponywear aahhhh *dives in*

kagetomari:

i love drawing clowns

Rosetta is the sweetest and I love how vivid her clowny art is &lt;3

kagetomari:

i love drawing clowns

Rosetta is the sweetest and I love how vivid her clowny art is <3

glownshowpony:

Babydoll’s MOC/MIB G1 My Little Pony Collection «view more pics

that Reverse Gusty though ((O__o))

-drools-
I hate how some plastic bubbles get yellowed from age or being in the sun :c That’s what happened with my Argie Lofty so I took her out of her package. (The Ultimate Pony Sin)

I am I 目玉焼きニットプルオーバー

Some various Spring-y happenings around the house :) Pumpkin flowers in April!

What snakes are for! boopin.

A commission by Squeedge from several years ago, my Boogle juggling for a crowd of e. posticus cockroaches (some of my fave roach species) :o) I look at this picture frequently and wish it were Halloweeeeen.
~More Received Art~

A commission by Squeedge from several years ago, my Boogle juggling for a crowd of e. posticus cockroaches (some of my fave roach species) :o) I look at this picture frequently and wish it were Halloweeeeen.

~More Received Art~

About half of my MLP collection, I need more shelves! All G1, many from my childhood, also my infamous Popples clock P:~More junk I collect~

About half of my MLP collection, I need more shelves! All G1, many from my childhood, also my infamous Popples clock P:

~More junk I collect~

stuckinabucket:

The tiger keelback (Rhabdophis tigrinus) has been annoying pedants the world over for years by being both venomous and poisonous.  It’s not very big (2-3 feet) and subsists mostly on a diet of amphibians.  It’s not terribly aggressive, strongly preferring to either play dead during low ambient temperatures or run away during higher ambient temperatures.

Above: Part of the “no, seriously, I’m dead” display is flattening out their necks to better show off their orange stripes.  There’s apparently some question as to whether this is an aposematic display, but given the fact that it’s venomous, poisonous, and how many other snakes that do the neck thing as a “fuck ooooooooooff” display, I’d say the answer is probably that yes, it’s an aposematic display.

They take the playing dead thing pretty seriously, too.  I mean, they go limp, which is kind of hilarious in a venomous snake. 

Above: What passed for acceptable science in 1983.

There are rattlesnakes out there shaking their heads at this snake.

Part of the lack of significant aggression is probably due to the fact that it’s a rear-fanged snake, which is an arrangement that’s pretty effective if you’re killing small animals to eat them and less desirable if you’re trying to like, keep something thirty times your size from eating you.  Rear-fanged snakes tend to have to open their mouths a lot wider to get a decent fang-grip on something, and the venom delivery mechanism can be a sad mockery of efficiency by occasionally requiring the snakes to actually chew on something to get it properly envenomed*.

Above: Western Hognose snake, which is venomous but not in a way that humans need to care about, displaying its sad little fangs.

Front-fanged snakes generally have both an easier time getting a good strike in and a much better injection mechanism.

The poisonous part comes in due to these snakes being in the habit of first eating poisonous toads and then taking the toads’ chemical defenses as their own.  Unlike the garter snakes who eat rough-skinned newts and wind up just generally toxic, tiger keelbacks have special glands where they concentrate and store the toads’ poison.  Their nuchal glands are found running down either side of their necks, and woe betide you if you break the skin over them.  (There aren’t actually convenient ways for the snake to discharge the gland without tissue rupture.)  Mothers can and do pass loads of the toxin on to their clutches, assuming they have any to spare, which tides the snakelets over until toad-hatching season brings a ton of snakelet-sized poisonous toads for them to eat.

How confident are these bastards in their nuchal glands saving them?

Above: A snake smacking its neck into something that’s annoying it.

So the answer here is: Extremely confident.

Of course, the functionality of these glands depends on the availability of and their ability to catch the poisonous toads they get their poison from, but the great thing about the toxin is that it’s massively unpleasant (foul-smelling, produces acute burning sensation upon contact with mucous membranes, capable of making you quite sick if you eat it), but it’s probably not going to kill a large animal.  So once you’ve had one run-in with a locked and loaded tiger keelback, you really have no particular desire to bite one again, and seeing those stripes come out is going to bring back some really unpleasant memories no matter how much poison that individual snake might be packing.

*Coral snakes do this, for instance.  If you feel the need to let a coral snake bite you, please do not sit there and let it chew on you just because it is tiny and kind of ridiculous.

[Snake-Humiliation Olympics photo from “Death-Feigning Behavior of the Japanese Colubrid Snake Rhabdophis tigrinus.” Akio Mutoh. Herpetologica, 39:1 (Mar., 1983), pp. 78-80; Neck-butting photo from “Nuchal glands: a novel defensive system in snakes.” Akira Mori. Chemoecology, 22 (2012), pp. 187–198.]

awwh..